Excerpt from Negotiating the New START Treaty by Rose Gottemoeller

On Anatoly Antonov, her Russian counterpart in negotiating the treaty, Rose Gottemoller reveals: We had a wary mutual respect. That mutual respect was almost upended, though, by the “tough-girl negotiator” incident. After the April meeting of the presidents, we were driving a hard pace to complete the new treaty. As we entered June and were preparing for a July encounter...

Honoring the Life and Legacy of Professor Yü Ying-shih

We are greatly saddened by the passing of Professor Yü Ying-shih, whom we came to know through his memoir, From Rural China to the Ivy League: Reminiscences of Transformations in Modern Chinese History, which was scheduled to be published this month. Professor Yü set the gold standard for humanity and scholarship. As noted by Professor Michael S. Duke and Professor...

Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Chapter 12: Picturing Homes and Border Crossings: The Slavery Trope in Films of the Black Atlantic

In the twelfth and final chapter of Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Interactions, Identities, and Images, Awam Amkpa and Gunja SenGupta examine three films—Julie Dash’s Daughters of the Dust (United States, 1991), Euzhan Palcy’s Rue Cases-Nègres (Martinique, 1983), and Ousmane Sembène’s Ceddo (Senegal, 1977)—to examine the representation of slavery. The authors argue that on discursive and stylistic levels, these...

Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Chapter 11: Slaves Supplicant and Slaves Triumphant: The Middle Passage of an Abolitionist Icon

In the eleventh chapter of Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade:Interactions, Identities, and Images, Jeffrey R. Kerr-Richie examines a transition in the visual representation of the slave from the beseeching captive to the grateful ex-slave and argues that the popular visual image of slave supplication was crucial in constructing the metaphorical image of ex-slaves’ gratitude for their freedom. Even though...

Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Chapter 10: Hidden Beneath the Surface: Atlantic Slavery in Winslow Homer’s Gulf Stream

In Chapter 10 of Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Interactions, Identities, and Images, Peter H. Wood examines North American artist Winslow Homer’s famous 1899 painting, The Gulf Stream. Homer’s masterpiece is set in the Atlantic between Cuba and North America, with a distant ship and an ominous storm in the background. A solitary black man, adrift on a small...

Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Chapter 9: Women Merchants and Slave Depots: Saint-Louis, Senegal, and St. Mary’s, Madagascar

In the ninth chapter of Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Interactions, Identities, and Images, Wendy Wilson-Fall examines eighteenth-century Afro-Creole women traders, a subject neglected by scholars. Known as in-betweens, collaborators, and sometimes symbols of Westernization, creolization, and amalgamation in West African and Indian slave ports, these women married Europeans and created a niche where they could achieve a degree...

Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Chapter 8: Transatlantic Links: The Benguela-Bahia Connections, 1700–1850 (Excerpts)

In the eighth chapter of Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Interactions, Identities, and Images, Mariana P. Candido sheds light on the commercial and human exchanges between the Brazilian slave port of Salvador in Bahia and Benguela, in West Central Africa. Whereas many scholars privilege connections between Bahia and the Bight of Benin or between Rio de Janeiro and Luanda,...

Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Chapter 7: Between Memory, Myth, and History, Transatlantic Voyagers of the Casa Branca Temple (Excerpts)

In the seventh chapter of Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Interactions, Identities, and Images, Lisa Earl Castillo looks at the lives of African freedmen critical to the early days of the Casa Branca, one of the oldest Afro-Brazilian temples in the city of Salvador, Bahia. In connecting the trajectories of these freedmen and their travels across the Atlantic, Castillo...

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